Tutorials/Crits

objects/small sculptures/models/things

Objects on a plinth

Objects on a plinth

This is the collection of objects which I collected and made throughout this semester. They are all of a similar small scale as they were used as props/subjects for still life paintings subsequently made from them. How do they work as artworks by themselves and exhibited alongside the paintings of which they are subjects? I have been researching artist’s who make small sculptures for example:

Evan Holloway

Evan Holloway


Sam Windett

Sam Windett


Per Kirkeby

Per Kirkeby

They are also inspired by Diego Bianchi whose work I came across at the Lyon Biennial 2011. He makes bizarre installations and sculptures out of rubbish:

Diego Bianchi 1

Diego Bianchi 1


Diego Bianchi 2

Diego Bianchi 2

John Beagles suggested I look at Franz West’s adaptives:

Franz West 1

Franz West 1

Franz West 2

Franz West 2

Franz West 3

Franz West 3

I am interested in interrogating the subject of the rhopographic/the overlooked/debris in still life painting through looking at contemporary artists, for example Thomas Hirschhorn, Diego Bianchi who make artwork out of rubbish/disused things.

Thomas Hirshhorn

Thomas Hirshhorn

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Ibuprofen Box and Objects

Ibuprofen Box and Objects, acrylic screen print on heavy A2 cartridge paper

Ibuprofen Box and Objects, acrylic screen print on heavy A2 cartridge paper

This screenprint, for me exists between painting, photography and printing. It uses some of the same objects which I have used for other paintings and I have similarly composed them so that they occupy their own space on the plinth and overlap/relate with each other dynamically. A significant part of this is the passage of light and shadow across the objects. As Morandi did, I have painted my objects white so that light and shadow effects are more clearly visible. As a screen print, it works differently and in some ways more effectively than the still life paintings I have done. The objects retain their own identity – their hand made quality, the modelling and cracks in the clay, the details in the cardboard and bottle top. The final image lays bare what the still life paintings conceal and disguise – whereas in the paintings, scale, weight, substance, identity and location of objects is deliberately ambiguous. However, as a black and white screen print, it has a strange archived quality as if it might be from a black and white photograph of work by a modernist sculptor (were it not for the ibuprofen box), for example:

Brancusi

Brancusi


Andrew Sneddon suggested I look at the work of artist Bill Culbert who plays with similarly basic objects and the manipulation of light and shadow upon them:
Small Glass Pouring Light, Bill Culbert

Small Glass Pouring Light, Bill Culbert

Yellow Still Life, Bill Culbert

Yellow Still Life, Bill Culbert


Expanded painting/Tutorial with Andrew Sneddon, 15 October 2012

Expanded practice was discussed and the concept of expanded painting which Krauss mentions in the conclusion of her essay, Sculpture in The Expanded Field.  What might expanded painting be? The following quote is from the conclusion of Rosalind Krauss’ essay, Sculpture in The Expanded Field:

“it is obvious that the logic of the space of postmodernist practice is no longer organized around the definition of a given medium on the grounds of material, or, for that matter, the perception of material. It is organized instead through the  universe of terms that are felt to be in opposition within a cultural situation. (The postmodernist space of painting would obviously involve a similar expansion around a different set of terms from the pair architecture/landscape-a set that would probably turn on the opposition uniqueness/reproducibility.)”

I am interested in this in relation to the different forms in which my current practice is developing – model making, collage, screenprinting, digital artwork, painting. How can these different forms synthesise or play off each other? Neil Mulholland has also written about expanded painting:

“Expanded Painting is concerned with ways in which such painterly processes have transmogrified or extended beyond the frame in order to creatively respond to the rigorous challenges set by conceptual art. Expanded Painting is, crucially, a development of, rather than a reaction towards, conceptualism.”

How can I contextualise my work in the wider discourse of contemporary art practice? How can a painterly approach be applied to new art forms? What is a painterly approach – using colour, creating visual imagery, spontaneity, the methodology of responding to a blank canvas (or ‘confronting the void’)?


Tutorial with Andrew Sneddon 24th September

This focussed on a review of work I had done over the past year until starting the MFA. Discussion focussed on where I locate my practice in relation to painting and focussed on artist Neal Tait and his influence upon my recent work. Questions which arose from this tutorial included:

– How can I develop my painting practice? Discussion focussed on my recent puffin painting (see below) and about how it demonstrates intuitive and expressionist qualities. The relationship between figuration and abstraction is something I wish to develop.

– I like the playfulness of Neil Tate’s work; the way it reworks mass-media/pop-art subject matter with reference to older painting including impressionist and post impressionist painters. Is there anything I can criticise about Neal Tait’s work? A lot of his pictures have faces in them and sometimes this feels unnecessary. Perhaps painting faces into ambiguous/abstract pictures is an easy way of finishing them or making them make sense through facial recognition. I am interested in how I can develop my work without an over reliance on the human face or human figure as a means of engagement. Disembodied imagery appeals to me.

untitled (1), oil on canvas, 2012, 92cm x 68cm

untitled (1), oil on canvas, 2012, 92cm x 68cm

Neal Tait, The-Balloon

Neal Tait, The-Balloon